Auditions for “Ragtime”

Sunday, August 11, 2:00 – 5:00PM
Monday, August 12, 7:00 – 10:00PM

Sign up for an audition slot here.

Auditions will be held by appointment on  Sunday, August 11 from 2:00 PM– 5:00PM and Monday, August 12 from 6:00PM – 9:00PM. Auditioners should sign up for an audition slot at www.broadview-heights-spotlights.org.  Invited callbacks, if necessary, will be held on Wednesday, August 14.    Rehearsals will begin the week of September 22.  The show runs November 8 – 23 and will be the performed in the Spotlights’ new 3200-square-foot flexible theater space!

This musical is set in the volatile melting pot of turn-of-the-century New York, weaving together three distinctly American tales – that of a stifled upper-class wife, a determined Jewish immigrant and a daring young Harlem musician – united by their courage, compassion and belief in the promise of the future. Together, they confront history’s timeless contradictions of wealth and poverty, freedom and prejudice, hope and despair… and what it means to live in America.

Written by the award-winning composer/lyricist team of Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens (Once on This Island, Seussical, and Lucky Stiff), noted playwright Terrence McNally, and based on E.L. Doctorow’s distinguished novel, Ragtime is the winner of the 1998 Tony Awards for Best Score, Book and Orchestrations, and both the Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle Awards for Best Musical and Best Score.

The show will be directed by Tim Anderson and music directed by Ryan Bergeron.  Performers of all ethnicities (ages 15 and up) are invited to audition.

The roles of Tateh and Mother have been cast; all other roles are open. There are a small number of roles available for younger performers, and those interested should contact the director directly at education@broadview-heights-spotlights.org.

Those auditioning should:

  • Sign up for an audition slot here.
  • Arrive 10 minutes prior to their audition slot to complete an audition form.
  • Plan to attend only one night of auditions.
  • Be familiar with the show and its music and themes.
  • Prepare two brief (up to one-minute) contrasting songs (one up-tempo, one ballad), in the style of the show.
  • Bring sheet music in the correct keys, hole-punched in a three-ring binder.  Singers will not be permitted to sing a cappella.
  • Bring a list of conflicts between September 22 and November 23.

Additional questions may be sent to the director at education@broadview-heights-spotlights.org.

Roles
(Genders and ages listed are those of the character.)

Coalhouse Walker, Jr. Male
African-American
Age: 25 to 35
Vocal range: G2 – A4
A proud and talented pianist. He is sophisticated, with a romantic demeanor and gentle heart though an intimidating build.
Sarah Female
African-American
Age: 20 to 25
Vocal range: G#3 – F#5
Washwoman. Sarah is beautiful and filled with a strong will to live fueled by an innocent spirit. Falls deeply in love with Coalhouse after much resistance.
Booker T. Washington Male
African-American
Age: 45 to 55
Vocal range: D3 – Eb4
Incredibly intelligent social activist. He is an eloquent and articulate gentleman with no patience for Black Americans leading less than exemplary lives.
Sarah’s Friend Female
African-American
Age: 18 to 25
Vocal range: D3 – D5
A friend of Sarah’s who attends her funeral.
Emma Goldman Female
Russian-American.
Age: 35 to 45
Vocal range: B3 – D5
Social activist. With an unapologetically demanding presence, she is a leader and powerful woman.
Father Male
Age: 30 to 45
Vocal range: A2 – F4
Mother’s professionally successful husband. Fancying himself an amateur explorer, he is commanding and attractive. Enjoys being the family breadwinner.
Younger Brother Male
Age: 20 to 25
Vocal range: B2 – F#4
Mother’s younger brother. With his wiry frame and obsessive personality, he is an erratic soul. Influenced greatly by Goldman’s teachings.
Grandfather Male
Age: 60 to 70
Mother’s very conservative father. He is a retired professor and easily irritated by nearly everything.
Harry Houdini Male
Hungarian-American
Age: 25 to 35
Vocal range: E3 – G4
The famous magician. With dark features and notable physical ability, he stands as a symbol of the ‘American Dream.
Evelyn Nesbit Female
Age: 18 to 21
Vocal range: B3 – D5
Beautiful vaudeville performer. Thrust into the limelight after the high-profile murder of her lover, the entire world is her stage.
Henry Ford Male
Age: 35 to 45
Vocal range: D4 – F5
an American industrialist and founder of the Ford Motor Company
J.P. Morgan Male
Age: 60 to 65
the rich, famous financier
Willie Conklin Male
Age: 25 to 40
Vocal range: D4 – F5
A racist volunteer fireman who destroys Coalhouse’s car
Little Girl
(Email Director)
Female
Latvian-American
Age: 7 to 10
Vocal range: C4 – Bb4
Tateh’s daughter. A confused and vulnerable child in a brand-new home, she is guarded and shy. Loves her father very much.
Little Boy
(Email Director)
Male
Age: 8 to 12
Vocal range: E4 – D5
Mother and Father’s son. He is open-hearted and curious with inexplicable clairvoyance. Never passes judgement on others.
Ensemble A highly featured, diverse group of Baseball Fans; Coalhouse Supporters; Firemen; Harlem Citizens, Immigrants To America; New Rochelle Citizens; Reporters; Vacationers
Mother This role has been cast. The consummate wife and mother. A kind woman with incredible moral fiber. Refined, intelligent, and graceful. She is accepting of others.
Tateh This role has been cast. The haggard artist and father. He wears the trials and tribulations of his past on his sleeve but remains optimistic.

 

Full Synopsis

Act One

We are introduced to the social and political climate of the United States in the early twentietth century by meeting a parade of characters – famous celebrities and private citizens of the time. First, we visit New Rochelle, New York, to meet a well-to-do white family: Mother, Father, their Little Boy, Mother’s Younger Brother and Grandfather. Next, we go to Harlem to meet Coalhouse Walker, Jr., a ragtime pianist, and his admirers. Immigrants arrive at Ellis Island, where we meet Tateh, an artist who makes silhouettes, and his Little Girl. The lives of these three American families are entwined with Booker T. Washington, Harry Houdini, J.P. Morgan, Henry Ford, Evelyn Nesbit and Emma Goldman. Whites, African Americans, immigrants and celebrities are set on a collision course from the opening number (“Ragtime”).

Father is accompanying Admiral Peary on a trip to the North Pole. At the dock, he consoles Mother that everything will be the same upon his return, but Mother is not convinced (“Goodbye My Love”). On its way out of the harbor, Father’s ship passes a rag ship filled with immigrants, arriving in New York. Tateh and the Little Girl are on board. Tateh and Father wave to one another; Father admires the immigrants for their naive bravery in coming to a new land, and Tateh questions Father’s reasons for leaving the place that he has worked so hard to find. Simultaneously, Mother wonders what this year without her husband will bring (“Journey On”).

Mother’s Younger Brother is in love with Evelyn Nesbit. He is frustrated and lost, searching for meaning in his life and hoping to find it in her. Her show is a vaudeville act that tells the true story of her lover’s murder by her famous husband (“Crime of the Century”). Younger Brother goes to all of her shows. One day, after the show, Younger Brother approaches her, but she dismisses him.

The scene shifts to Mother and the Little Boy in the garden. The Little Boy wants to see Houdini, as he has a cryptic message for him: “Warn the duke.” While he begins to read her Father’s letter, mother makes a shocking discovery – there is a newborn African-American child buried in the flowerbed. The police arrive on the premises with Sarah, the mother of the child. Rather than let Sarah go to prison, Mother takes Sarah and the child into her own home (“What Kind of Woman”).

With many other immigrants, Tateh and The Little Girl disembark at Ellis Island, full of hope (“America”). Tateh sets up his business on the Lower East Side, selling paper silhouettes of celebrities for a nickel each. Emma Goldman chastises him for selling one of J.P. Morgan, the epitome of capitalism. J.P. Morgan enters the scene and metaphorically crushes the immigrants, but Harry Houdini magically swoops in as an emblem of immigrant triumph. Time passes, Tateh becomes less idealistic – he is still poor and the Little Girl is sick. When a man tries to buy the Little Girl, Tateh has reached rock bottom. He swears to make a better life for himself and his child (“Success”).

Far Uptown, the people of Harlem celebrate the great musician, Coalhouse Walker, Jr. (“His Name Was Coalhouse Walker”). He tells his friends the story of how he loved and lost Sarah, but reveals that he’s just found out where she might be living and is determined to win her back (“Getting’ Ready Rag”). Henry Ford appears to tell us of his new method of mass production and his most famous product – the Model T (“Henry Ford”). A new car rolls off of the assembly line, and Coalhouse drives off in search of Sarah.

Back in New Rochelle, Mother and the Little Boy wait at the train station, on their way to New York City to take care of the family business while Father is away. Tateh and the Little Girl wait across the tracks for a train to Boston. Mother and Tateh greet one another, and Tateh is surprised to be treated with respect (“Nothing Like the City”). The Little Boy has a premonition that they will see Tateh and the Little Girl again, but Mother tells him that is absurd.

On his way to New Rochelle, Coalhouse encounters a group of hostile volunteer firemen who threaten him for being cocky by driving past them in his new car. Meanwhile, Sarah, living in Mother’s attic, begs her infant’s forgiveness for her desperation – trying to explain what drove her to such an unimaginable act (“Your Daddy’s Son”). When Coalhouse arrives at Mother’s home, Sarah will not see him.

Coalhouse returns every Sunday for weeks, wooing Sarah with his ragtime tunes and winning over Mother, Grandfather and the Little Boy (“The Courtship”). Father returns from the North Pole to find a very different household from the one he left. He cannot wrap his head around the facts that his wife is independent, his family is accepting of the African-American courtship happening in his living room and there is ragtime music coming from his piano (“New Music”).

Finally, Sarah comes down to see Coalhouse and they reunite. Coalhouse tells Sarah of his admiration for Booker T. Washington’s achievements and, together, he and Sarah imagine a future for their child (“Wheels of a Dream”). Meanwhile, in Lawrence, Massachusetts, Tateh has lost sight of the American dream and now works at a mill 64 hours a week. In Union Square, Emma Goldman tries to generate a strike against the oppressive mill owners. Younger Brother happens to hear her speech and is energized to the cause of workers rights – he finally has something in which to believe (“The Night That Goldman Spoke in Union Square”).

A violent labor strike erupts in Lawrence. Tateh intends to put The Little Girl on a train to a safer place, with other children and a chaperone. However, she is so distraught that he jumps on the train with her. He soothes her terror with a flipbook of silhouettes that he has made (“Gliding”). The train conductor notices the book of moving silhouettes and buys it for his own child. Tateh sees this as a wonderful new business idea.

Coalhouse once again encounters the volunteer firemen, and, this time, they do more than threaten him. As Booker T. Washington gives a speech about rising above and holding fast, the men destroy Coalhouse’s car. Coalhouse moves through the legal channels in search of justice for this crime against him, but he is denied at every avenue (“Justice”). He postpones his marriage to Sarah until the matter is resolved. Sarah, out of desperation and naiveté, tries to seek help from a visiting Vice Presidential candidate but is clubbed to death by police, who suspect her of having a gun (“President”). Act One closes with the anger and grief of Sarah’s funeral (“Till We Reach That Day”).

Act Two

Coalhouse mourns the loss of Sarah (“Coalhouse’s Soliloquy”). Seeking vengeance, he shoots three of the firemen who trashed his car, burns their firehouse and demands that the fire chief, Willy Conklin, be brought to justice (“Coalhouse Demands”).

A group of young men joins Coalhouse as he strikes out against the system. Booker T. Washington publicly condemns Coalhouse’s actions. Father goes to the police to tell them what he knows about Coalhouse. Younger Brother, who is moved by the plight of the oppressed and angry about the injustice done to Coalhouse, erupts at Father for working against Coalhouse. He storms out of the house in anger, and Mother, who is still caring for Sarah and Coalhouse’s baby, is deeply upset. In reaction, Father takes the Little Boy to a baseball game. But even this has changed and is now a game, not just for upper class whites, but for immigrants, too (“What a Game”). Meanwhile, Coalhouse’s band of men sets fires around the city. Reporters besiege the family in New Rochelle. Father, thinking that it is time to get away, takes the family to Atlantic City, where Evelyn Nesbit and Houdini both happen to be starring attractions (“Let’s Run Away to Atlantic City”).

In Atlantic City, we discover that Tateh is now a famous film director and has recreated himself as Baron Ashkenazy. His daughter, healthy and beautifully dressed, is by his side. Once again, Tateh meets Mother and tells her the story of his success (“Buffalo Nickel Photoplay, Inc.”).

Later, the Little Boy asks Houdini for his autograph and gives him the message: “Warn the duke.” Houdini is confused and intrigued, but the Little Boy runs off. The Little Girl and Little Boy play together as Tateh and Mother watch from the boardwalk (“Our Children”). Tateh reveals his humble origins to Mother, who is moved by his honesty.

In Harlem, Younger Brother searches for Coalhouse and, although the residents are distrustful of him, one of Coalhouse’s men takes him to Coalhouse’s hideout. Meanwhile, drawn by laughter and dancing in a club, Coalhouse thinks of the first time that he met Sarah (“Sarah Brown Eyes”). A blindfolded Younger Brother is brought to Coalhouse’s den. Younger Brother wants to express his sympathy for Coalhouse’s actions but all he can manage to do is offer his knowledge of explosives (“He Wanted to Say”). Coalhouse focuses his rage by taking over J.P. Morgan’s Library. He threatens to blow up the library and all of its treasures, as well as himself and all of his men, one of whom is now Younger Brother. Father tells Mother that he has volunteered to act as a negotiator, and Mother realizes that this experience has irrevocably changed their relationship (“Back to Before”).

Coalhouse and his men barricade themselves inside the library. Emma Goldman applauds this, but Booker T. Washington deplores these actions. Father tells the authorities that Booker T. Washington is the only man to whom Coalhouse will listen. Booker T. is sent into the library to speak with Coalhouse. He chides Coalhouse, both for risking the lives of the young men around him, while leaving his own son to be raised by white men, and for endangering the position of all African Americans by making them seem hot-headed and violent (“Look What You’ve Done”). He assures Coalhouse that, if he surrenders, he will have a fair trial and a forum for his opinions. Coalhouse negotiates the safe passage of his men, including Younger Brother, while Father remains behind in the library. The men protest his decision, but he explains to them that the only way to win the fight is to go out into the world and tell their story (“Make Them Hear You”). When Coalhouse is left alone with Father, he asks about his son. Father promises a safe end to the standoff, but, when Coalhouse exits the building to surrender, he is shot dead by authorities.

The era of ragtime ends. The characters come forward, one by one, to tell us the end of their stories: Younger Brother joins the revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, Emma Goldman is deported, Booker T. Washington establishes the Tuskegee Institute, Evelyn Nesbit fades into obscurity, Houdini has the one true mystical experience of his life when he is performing in Sarajevo and the duke is shot, Grandfather dies and Father is killed during wartime. Finally, Mother and Tateh marry and move to California with their children.

As the curtain falls, Little Coalhouse runs into Mother’s arms, and men and women of all nationalities – and races – join Mother on the stage (“Epilogue”).

Auditions for “Rumors” by Neil Simon

Sunday, June 30, 7:00 – 9:00PM

Monday, July 1, 7:00 – 9:00PM

The Broadview Heights Spotlights Theater will hold auditions for Neil Simon’s comedic farce, Rumors, on Sunday, June 30 and Monday, July 1 from 7:00 – 9:00PM. 

This farce takes place in a large New York City townhouse where the Deputy Mayor has just shot himself on the evening of his tenth wedding anniversary party.  The victim’s wife is nowhere in sight, and his lawyer tries to convince his own wife to get “the story” straight before the other guests arrive.  Confusions and miscommunications mount as the evening spins off into classic farcical hilarity. 

The show will be directed by Dan Sekanic and will run August 23 – September 7. Rehearsals will begin in mid-July.  Auditioners are asked to bring a list of conflicts from July 7 to September 7. Auditions will consist of readings from the script.    Rumors contains mature language and content with which those auditioning should be familiar and comfortable. 

Questions may be emailed to the director at dsekanic73@gmail.com.

Character Breakdown

  • Ken Gorman – (40) A well-to-do lawyer. Wealthy, but by no means pretentious. Takes charge of the situation. Married to Chris. Halfway through the show, a gunshot causes his temporary deafness.
  • Chris Gorman – (mid-30’s) Another lawyer, married to Ken. Beautiful, easily flustered. Frantically tries to maintain normalcy at the party. Has recently quit smoking, which drives her to drink a bit more. Lenny
  • Ganz – (Late 30’s, early 40’s) – A wealthy accountant, distraught over the recent destruction over his new car. Starts the show with an extreme case of whiplash. Intolerant of the gossipy-lifestyle that he is often involved in.
  • Claire Ganz – (Late 30’s) – Ganz’s wife. Very concerned with appearances (hers and others’). Starts the play with a swollen lip. Likes to gossip.
  • Ernie Cusack – (Early 50’s) – a psychiatrist. Affable, smokes a pipe. Loves his wife very much. Tries to be as helpful as possible cooking the evening’s dinner.
  • Cookie Cusack – (40’s) – has her own cooking show. Suffers from extreme back spasms. Loves her husband very much. A bit absent-minded at times.
  • Glenn Cooper – (30-40) A handsome man running for State Senate. Worried about his own reputation. Struggles with placating his wife, who is convinced he is having an affair (which he may or may not be).
  • Cassie Cooper – (late 20’s, early 30’s) Glenn’s beautiful wife. Obsesses over her husbands’ relationships with other women. Quick to anger. Must rub her quartz crystal to calm herself down.
  • Officer Welch (M) – (30-50) – A city police officer having a rough night. Does not tolerate lying. Sees through the “classy” façade that these high-society types put up.
  • Officer Pudney (F) – (20-30) – Welch’s partner. A strong but silent type.

 

Auditions for “The Who’s Tommy” – Summer Youth Production

Sunday, April 7
2:00 – 6:00PM

Click here to sign up for an audition slot.

The 2019 Broadview Heights Spotlights Summer Youth Production is The Who’s Tommy.  Based on the band’s iconic 1969 rock concept album, this rock opera is an exhilarating story of hope, healing and the human spirit. The story of the pinball-playing, deaf, dumb and blind boy who triumphs over his adversities has inspired, amazed and puzzled audiences.  The show celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2019!

Auditions will be held by appointment on Sunday, April 7 from 2:00 – 6:00 p.m.  Auditioners should sign up for an audition slot at www.broadview-heights-spotlights.org.  Invited callbacks, if necessary, will be held on Thursday, April 11.  Rehearsals will begin at the end of April.  The show runs June 20 – 30, and will be the premiere production the Spotlights’ new 3200-square-foot performance space!

The show will be directed by Tim Anderson, music directed by Ryan Bergeron, and choreographed by Maggie Majercik.  Performers (ages 12 to 20) are invited to audition. There are a small number of roles available for younger performers, and those interested should contact the director directly at education@broadview-heights-spotlights.org.

The show contains mature language and themes, and those auditioning and their parents should be familiar with the material before auditioning.

Those auditioning should:

  • Plan to attend only one night of auditions.
  • Be familiar with the show and its music, language, and themes.
  • Prepare two one-minute, contrasting songs (one up-tempo, one ballad), at least one of these should be a rock song in the style of the show.
  • Bring sheet music in the correct keys, hole-punched in a three-ring binder.  Singers will not be permitted to sing a cappella.
  • Bring a list of conflicts between April 22 and June 30 (including all school concerts, lessons, practices, games, family obligations, etc.).

Click here to sign up for an audition slot.

 Synopsis

After witnessing the accidental murder of his mother’s lover by his father, Tommy is traumatized into catatonia and, as the boy grows, he suffers abuse at the hands of his sadistic relatives and neighbors. As an adolescent, he’s discovered to have an uncanny knack for playing pinball and, when his mother finally breaks through his catatonia, he becomes an international pinball superstar.

Links

Character List

The production team reserves the right to make non-traditional casting decisions/doubling of roles.  Vocal ranges are given as a guide, but are flexible.

Name Description Vocal Range
Mrs. Walker

 

A weary middle-class woman. Mrs. Walker is tired and frustrated from trying to care for and cure Tommy. Tommy’s mother and Captain Walker’s wife.

G3 – D6

Captain Walker

 

A former soldier with lingering guilt. He murders his wife’s lover after coming back from a POW camp, resulting in Tommy’s trauma-induced blindness, deafness, and dumbness. Father to Tommy and husband to Mrs. Walker.

F3 – C#5

Uncle Ernie

 

A lecherous, drunken bachelor. Ernie molests a young Tommy and later runs a children’s camp seeking to profit from Tommy’s popularity. Mrs. Walker’s brother and Tommy’s uncle.

G2 – Bb4

Tommy/Narrator

 

An embittered young genius stricken deaf, dumb, and blind after a childhood trauma. Tommy discovers that he is a natural master of pinball, and later becomes a cult-like hero figure to masses enthralled by his story. Captain Walker and Mrs. Walker’s son.

Db3 – B4

Cousin Kevin

 

A bully with sadistic tendencies. Tortures his cousin, Tommy, when they’re young and later seizes the opportunity to profit from Tommy’s success.

Ab2 – B4

Gypsy

 

A brazen drug dealer and prostitute. Tommy’s parents bring him to the Gypsy to experiment with unusual cures.

G3 – F5

The Specialist

 

A doctor with modern ideas about how to cure Tommy. Tommy’s parents hire him in their desperation to find any cure for their son.

G#3 – F4

Sally Simpson

 

A bold, sensitive, and excitable teenybopper. Sally develops a fan crush on Tommy and rushes the stage to be close to him.

F3 – D5

Highly Featured Ensemble Roles Including:

Harlots
Harmonica Player
Kevin’s Father
Kevin’s Mother
Lads and Lasses
Minister
Minister’s Wife
Mrs. Simpson
Nurses
Soldiers
The Hawker
Guards
Reporters

Click here to sign up for an audition slot.

Additional questions may be sent to the director at education@broadview-heights-spotlights.org.

 Auditions for “The Velveteen Rabbit”

Auditions for The Velveteen Rabbit

Sunday, February 24,  7:00 PM

The Broadview Heights Spotlights will be holding auditions for its upcoming Theater for Young Audiences production of The Velveteen Rabbit, adapted by James Still from the classic story by Margery Williams. Director Brenton Cochran is seeking a  large cast consisting of kids (10 and up), teens, and adults.  Auditions will consist of readings from the script.  Rehearsals will begin March 3; the show runs May 4 – 12.

If you are interested in auditioning, but unable to attend the scheduled time, please contact the director at fashionlovestheatre@gmail.com.

This enchanting version of the classic children’s story is a winner of The Charlotte B. Chorpenning Playwright Award.  Unbeknownst to Andrew’s grumpy nursemaid, there is a life to the playthings on the floor and in the toy cabinet when the lights go out in the nursery Timothy Lion, Train Engine, Skin Horse, Model Boat and Velveteen Rabbit all spring to life.  Actors represent the ’spirit’ of each toy-chattering, bickering and sharing their feelings in hilarious and touching interactions.  With narration by the tender and grandfatherly Skin Horse Spirit, you’ll laugh and cry along with the characters as they endure the trials and tribulations of their unique experiences-especially the Rabbit Spirit, who learns about love when he gains the affection of the young boy.  The raggedy stuffed bunny is with him every moment until Andrew comes down with scarlet fever and the doctor orders all bedding, including the much-loved toy, to be burned.  Rabbit Spirit escapes that terrible fate by a ‘hare,’ finding himself among the wild rabbits and the beautiful nursery magic fairy.  With a late-Victorian flavor in the dialogue and costuming, this adaptation creatively and beautifully renders for the stage the miraculous story of a stuffed animal made real by a child’s love and a little magic.

Roles

Andrew, a young boy (can be played by a girl as Andrea)

Nana, an elderly nursemaid

Uncle Brad, his uncle; late twenties

Mother, Andrew’s mother

Doctor, attends to Andrew

Peavey, servant

Timothy Spirit, a wood-jointed toy lion

Train Engine Spirit

Skin Horse Spirit

Model Boat Spirit

Rabbit Spirit

Nursery Magic Fairy

Wild Rabbit One

Wild Rabbit Two

Wild Rabbit Chorus

Brown Rabbit, female; wise about the world

Auditions for “Dancing at Lughnasa”

Auditions will be held at the Broadview Heights Spotlights Theater for Dancing at Lughnasa on Sunday, January 13 and Monday, January 14 from 6:30 to 9:00 P.M.   The show runs March 8 – 23, 2019.
The role of “Father Jack Mundy” has been cast.  All other roles are open.  This show is directed by Rose Leininger.  Auditions will be selected scenes from the script.  If you have an Irish song you know, we will hear a few bars a capella.  Resumes and headshots are not necessary, but appreciated.
About the Play:
It’s the Summer of 1936 and Europe is on the verge of terrible change.  The Mundy family are sheltered in their close-knit home in Ballybeg, Donegal.  Michael,  the illegitimate son of the youngest sister of a family of 5 sisters and one Brother, feels the joy and security of his family and narrates us through this tale of family and trials.
When Michaels his father comes home, the cracks begin to show.  Secrets and sorrows break through the happiness and repressed passion is unleashed.  Uncle Jack comes back from 25 years serving in Africa, and anxieties which can tear the world apart for Ballybed come to the surface. Amid all this, the joyous music of Ireland and the purity of family will pull us through.
The role of Father Jack Mundy has been cast.
All other roles are available:
  • Kate Mundy, 40+, Spinster, afraid of what everyone thinks.
  • Maggie Mundy, 40’s, Smoker, rough, and rowdy, full-on joker.
  • Rose Mundy, 30’s, A little slow-believes and trusts everyone to a fault
  • Agnes Mundy, 35-40, Quiet, introvert, Rose’s protector.
  • Christina Mundy, 30’s, Full of spirit and adventure, loves dancing.
  • Gerry Evans, 30-35, Very adventurous, loves music and dancing.
  • Michael Evans, Late 20’s, Son of Christina – young, very serious and thoughtful.

 Auditions for “Man of La Mancha” and “A Grand Night for Singing”

 Auditions for Man of La Mancha and A Grand Night for Singing

Sunday, August 12,  7:00 – 10:00PM
Monday, August 13, 7:00 – 10:00PM

No appointment needed, but auditioners must arrive one hour before the scheduled end time.

 

Auditions for Man of La Mancha are open to ages 13 and up.  The role of Miguel de Cervantes/Don Quixote in Man of La Mancha has been cast.  All other roles are available.  Two roles may exist for children ages 8 – 13, contact the director regarding these roles at rbergeron@broadview-heights-spotlights.org. Man of La Mancha runs November 2 – 17, 2018. See below for more information.

 

A Grand Night for Singing requires strong singers able to hold complex harmonies: three women and two men, ages 18 and up.  This production runs February 1 – 16, 2019. See below for more information.

 

Those auditioning should:

  • Plan to attend only one night.
  • Prepare two contrasting songs (1 ballad, 1 up tempo) from the classic/golden age of musical theater, no more than one minute in length each. Songs from either show are acceptable.  Those auditioning for A Grand Night for Singing, are strongly encouraged to prepare at least one Rodgers and Hammerstein piece.
  • Bring sheet music in the correct keys, hole-punched in a three-ring binder.  Singers will not be permitted to sing a cappella.
  • Bring a list of conflicts applicable to the rehearsal schedule for the show(s) you are auditioning for. (LaMancha: September 16 – November 16; Grand Night: December – February)

All auditions will occur at the Broadview Heights Spotlights Theater, located in Building #22 on the Broadview Center Property at 9543 Broadview Road, Broadview Heights, OH  44147.  Our facility is located to the left of the Police Station in the rear of the of property.  Follow the blue “Theater” signs once turning into the main driveway.

Man of La Mancha

Written by Dale Wasserman
Music by Mitch Leigh
Lyrics by Joe Darion

The Spotlights’ production runs November 2 – 17, 2018.

Rehearsals start the week of September 16.

Roles

Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote) – THIS ROLE HAS BEEN PRECAST
Sancho Panza — manservant
Aldonza (Dulcinea)
Antonia — Alonso’s niece
Fermina — Moorish Girl dancer
Innkeeper
Maria — innkeeper’s wife
Housekeeper — employee of Alonso
Barber
Padre
Dr. Sanson Carrasco — Antonia’s fiancé and Knight of the Mirrors

Ensemble
Captain of the Inquisition
Governor
Duke
Four Attendants to the Knight
Seven Muleteers: Jose, Tenorio, Paco, Juan, Anselmo, Pedro and a Guitar Player
Soldiers
Prisoners
Prison Guards
Gypsies (Moors)
Men of the Inquisition

Two roles may exist for children ages 8 – 13, contact the director regarding these roles at rbergeron@broadview-heights-spotlights.org.

Synopsis

A full synopsis can be found on Tams-Witmark’s website:  http://www.tamswitmark.com/shows/man-of-la-mancha/

 

 

A Grand Night for Singing

Music by Richard Rodgers
Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Music Arrangements by Fred Wells
Conceived by Walter Bobbie

The Spotlights’ production runs February 1 – 16, 2019.

Limited rehearsals in December, full rehearsals starting nightly in January.

Roles:

Martin – Leading Man, Baritone
Lynne – Leading Lady, Soprano
Victoria – Comic Ingenue, Second soprano
Jason – Comic Juvenile, Tenor
Alyson – Soubrette, Alto, Dancer

A Grand Night for Singing requires strong singers able to hold complex harmonies: three women and two men, ages 18 and up

Synopsis:

Taste and imagination, the two key ingredients for a first-rate revue, abound in this fresh take on the Rodgers & Hammerstein canon conceived by Tony Award winner Walter Bobbie. Over three decades after the duo’s final collaboration, The Sound of Music, took the Great White Way by storm, it was in fact this new R&H musical that opened the 1994 Broadway season with flair and distinction, garnering wildly enthusiastic notices as well as earning two Tony nominations, including Best Musical. Here at R&H, our founding fathers probably never imagined “Shall We Dance?” as a comic pas de deux for a towering beauty and her diminutive admirer, nor did they suspect that one day a lovelorn young lad might pose the musical question, “How do you solve a problem like Maria?” But that’s precisely the kind of invention lavished upon this new revue, with innovative musical arrangements including a sultry Andrews Sisters-esque “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Out-a My Hair,” a swingin’ “Honeybun” worthy of the Modernaires, and a jazzy “Kansas City”which leaves no question about how terrifically up to date the remarkable songs of R&H remain.

 

 

 

 

 Auditions for Mr. A’s Amazing Maze Plays

Auditions for Mr. A’s Amazing Maze Plays

Sunday, August 12 at 5:00 PM

Auditions for Mr. A’s Amazing Maze Plays by Alan Ayckbourn will be held on Sunday, August 12th from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM.

The play relies heavily on audience interaction to help the actors navigate a huge, 24-room mansion.  Because of the non-sequential nature of the script, strong actors of all ages are encouraged to audition.  Auditions will consist of readings from the script.

Additional questions may be sent to Director Jocelyn Laracuente at Jodell278@gmail.com.

This play will be our second Theater for Young Audiences (TYA) production of the year, aimed at providing opportunities for children and their families to experience high-quality theater while learning and practicing good audience etiquette. Performances will be held October 6 – 14; two performances (afternoon and evening) on each Saturday and one afternoon performance each Sunday.  Broadview Heights Spotlights’ Theater for Young Audiences Series is supported in part by the residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

All auditions will occur at the Broadview Heights Spotlights Theater, located in Building #22 on the Broadview Center Property at 9543 Broadview Road, Broadview Heights, OH  44147.  Our facility is located to the left of the Police Station in the rear of the of property.  Follow the blue “Theater” signs once turning into the main driveway.

Play Synopsis:

Suzy lives in a small cottage with her mother and her dog Neville – her father went up in a hot air balloon one day and never came back down. Except for missing Suzy’s father, they are all quite happy until the suave Mr. Accousticus moves into the mysterious old house across from their cottage and sweeps Mother off her feet. Suddenly Neville loses his bark, the birds stop singing, and Mr. Passerby insists his operatic  tenor voice has been stolen.  Suzy and Neville bravely decide to search through Mr. Accousticus’s mansion for the missing voices: at this point it’s up to the audience to choose which course to take (among 80 possible permutations!) through the maze of rooms, trap doors, and secret passageways, and also to remember the path to help the heroes safely out again afterwards.

About the Author:

Alan Ayckbourn has spent his life in theatre, rarely if ever tempted by television or film, which perhaps explains why he continues to be so prolific. To date he has written 77 plays, and his work has been translated into over 35 languages, is performed on stage and television throughout the world, and has won countless awards. Major successes include: Relatively Speaking, How the Other Half Loves, Absurd Person Singular, Bedroom Farce, A Chorus of Disapproval and The Norman Conquests. The National Theatre recently revived his 1980 play Season’s Greetings to great acclaim and the past year alone has seen West End productions of Absent Friends and A Chorus Of Disapproval. In 2009, he retired as artistic director of the Stephen Joseph, where almost all his plays have been and continue to be first staged. Holding the post for 37 years, he still feels that perhaps his greatest achievement was the establishment of this company’s first permanent home when the two auditoria complex fashioned from a former Odeon Cinema opened in 1996. In recent years, he has been inducted into American Theatre’s Hall of Fame, received the 2010 Critics’ Circle Award for Services to the Arts and became the first British playwright to receive both Olivier and Tony Special Lifetime Achievement Awards. He was knighted in 1997 for services to the theatre.

Characters:

SUZY
NEVILLE – her dog
MOTHER
FATHER
MR. ACOUSTICUS
MR. PASSERBY
1ST NARRATOR
2ND NARRATOR

 

Auditions for “The Importance of Being Earnest”

Auditions for The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

Tuesday, May 8 at 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday, May 9 at 7:00 p.m.

The Broadview Heights Spotlights will hold auditions for The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde on Tuesday, May 8 at 7:00 p.m. and Wednesday, May 9 at 7:00 p.m.  Auditions will take place at the Broadview Heights Cultural Arts Building, located on the Broadview Center Property, next to the Police Station, 9543 Broadview Road, Broadview Heights, OH 44147.

This production will be directed by Tyson Douglas Rand, and co-produced by Tara Corkery and Sarah Price.

Auditions will consist of readings from the script.

The show runs August 24 – September 8, 2018.

For additional information, contact tcorkery@broadview-heights-spotlights.org.

Play Synopsis:

John Worthing, a carefree young gentleman, is the inventor of a fictitious brother, “Ernest,” whose wicked ways afford John an excuse to leave his country home from time to time and journey to London, where he stays with his close friend and confidant, Algernon Moncrieff. Algernon has a cousin, Gwendolen Fairfax, with whom John is deeply in love. During his London sojourns, John, under the name Ernest, has won Gwendolen’s love, for she strongly desires to marry someone with the confidence-inspiring name of Ernest. But when he asks for Gwendolen’s hand from the formidable Lady Bracknell, John finds he must reveal he is a foundling who was left in a handbag at Victoria Station. This is very disturbing to Lady Bracknell, who insists that he produce at least one parent before she consents to the marriage.  Returning to the country home where he lives with his ward Cecily Cardew and her governess Miss Prism, John finds that Algernon has also arrived under the identity of the nonexistent brother Ernest. Algernon falls madly in love with the beautiful Cecily, who has long been enamored of the mysterious, fascinating brother Ernest.  With the arrival of Lady Bracknell and Gwendolen, chaos erupts.

About the Author:

Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900) was born in Dublin to Sir William Wilde and his wife Jane. While studying at Oxford, he was fascinated by the aesthetic movement and eventually became a proponent for L’art pour l’art (“Art for Art’s Sake”), and wrote the award-winning poem Ravenna. After he graduated in 1879, he moved to Chelsea in London to establish a literary career. Upon graduating in 1879, he moved to London to review art, write poetry and lecture in the UK, the United States and Canada. In 1884, Mr. Wilde married Constance Lloyd and, in the course of their turbulent marriage, had two sons. His first and only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, was published in 1891 and has been adapted for the stage. Mr. Wilde’s first successful theatrical endeavor, Lady Windermere’s Fan, opened in 1892. He went on to create the wonderfully popular comedies A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and the classic The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). Not long afterward, Mr. Wilde was publicly accused of homosexuality and arrested for gross indecency. During his time in prison he wrote De Profundis, a dramatic monologue and autobiography, which was addressed to his lover Bosie. Three years after his release in 1897, he died of cerebral meningitis in a rundown Paris hotel. Known for his philosophical wit and irreverent charm, Mr. Wilde is famously quoted as saying “Life is too important to be taken seriously.”

Characters:

John Worthing, J.P.
Algernon Moncrieff
Rev. Canon Chasuble, D. D.
Merriman, butler
Lane, manservant
Lady Bracknell
Hon. Gwendolen Fairfax
Cecily Cardew
Miss Prism, governess

 

Auditions for “Be More Chill” – Summer Youth Musical

Auditions for Be More Chill

Summer Youth Production

Monday, April 23 from 7:00 – 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 24 from 7:00 – 9:30 p.m.

The 2018 Broadview Heights Spotlights Summer Youth Production, Be More Chill, is based on the novel by Ned Vizzini. The show’s music and lyrics are by Joe Iconis, and the book is by Joe Tracz.  The main character is Jeremy, an average teenager. That is, until he finds out about “The Squip” – a tiny supercomputer that promises to bring him everything he desires most: a date with Christine, an invite to the raddest party of the year and a chance to survive life in his suburban New Jersey high school.

Auditions will be held on Monday, April 23 and Tuesday, April 24 from 7:00 p.m – 9:30 p.m.  No appointment is necessary, but those auditioning should arrive at least an hour before the scheduled end time.  Invited callbacks, if necessary, will be held by special arrangement later that week.  Rehearsals will begin the week of April 29.

The show runs June 21 – July 1.

The show will be directed by Tim Anderson and music directed by Ryan Bergeron.

Performers (ages 13 to 20) are invited to audition. The show contains adult language and themes, and those auditioning and their parents should be familiar with the material before auditioning.

Those auditioning should:

  • Plan to attend only one night of auditions.
  • Be familiar with the show and its music, language, and themes.
  • Prepare two one-minute, contrasting songs (one up-tempo, one ballad), at least one of which should demonstrate a contemporary vocal style.
  • Bring sheet music in the correct keys, hole-punched in a three-ring binder.  Singers will not be permitted to sing a cappella.
  • Bring a list of conflicts between April 29 and July 1 (including all school concerts, lessons, practices, games, family obligations, etc.).

Additional questions may be sent to the director at education@broadview-heights-spotlights.org.

 

Synopsis

Jeremy Heere is just an average teenager. That is, until he finds out about “The Squip” – a tiny supercomputer that promises to bring him everything he desires most: a date with Christine, an invite to the raddest party of the year and a chance to survive life in his suburban New Jersey high school. But is being the most popular guy in school worth the risk? This musical is based on the novel of the same name by Ned Vizzini.

Character List*:

Jeremy Heere, awkward high school junior
Christine Canigula, high school theatre girl, sweetly dorky
Michael Mell, Jeremy’s music-obsessed best friend
Jake Dillinger, high school awesomeness personified
Rich, five-feet, five-inches of teenage bully
Chloe, the hottest girl in school, crass and confident
Brooke, the second hottest girl in school, insecure
Jenna Rolan, that girl who knows everyone’s business
Jeremy’s dad, never wears pants.
Mr. Reyes
Scary Stockboy
The Squip, the supercomputer in Jeremy’s head.

*The production team may choose to cast a small, featured ensemble.

Auditions for “Dividing the Estate”

Auditions for Dividing the Estate by Horton Foote

Sunday, February 11 from 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.
Monday, February 12 from 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.

The Broadview Heights Spotlights will hold auditions for Dividing the Estate by Horton Foote on Sunday, February 11 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Monday, February 12 from 7:30PM – 9:00 p.m. No appointment is needed, but auditioners must arrive by 8:00 p.m. and plan on being in attendance for the full length of auditions. Auditions will take place at the Broadview Heights Cultural Arts Building, located on the Broadview Center Property, next to the Police Station, 9543 Broadview Road, Broadview Heights, OH 44147.

This production will be directed by Brenton Cochran, and co-produced by Adam Bowers and Jean Brennan.

Rehearsals will begin near the end of the February and typically run Sunday – Thursday based on cast availability. The show runs April 27, 2018 – May 12, 2018.

Please bring a list of conflicts between February 26 and May 12.

For additional information please visit www.broadview-heights-spotlights.org. Additional questions may be emailed to the director at fashionlovestheatre@gmail.com.

Play Synopsis:

Dividing the Estate is the story of the Gordon clan, a Texas family who has been hard hit by the precipitous drop in oil prices in 1987. Family matriarch Stella rules over the family, but she is 85 years old, and her family smells their inheritance coming. Her younger daughter, Mary Jo, comes to visit for the day along with her husband, and their two daughters, prompting a family get-together. Mary Jo is deeply in debt and wants to divide the estate before her mother dies. Various members of the family, including the servants, take sides in the debate, and wonder how much, if anything, there actually is to inherit. The family bickers as only a Southern family can, mentioning every slight and insult that has occurred over the past 80 years.

About the Author:

Horton Foote, in full Albert Horton Foote, (March 14, 1916 – March 4, 2009, Hartford), American playwright and screenwriter who evoked American life in beautifully observed minimal stories and was perhaps best known for his adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird. His first two plays, Wharton Dance (1940) and Texas Town (1941), were staged by the American Actors’ Company in New York City. Foote’s best-known original work, The Trip to Bountiful, was written as a television play and broadcast in 1953; later that year it was staged on Broadway, and in 1985 it was produced as a film, for which Foote also wrote the Academy Award-nominated screenplay. His low-key but insightful play The Young Man from Atlanta(1994) won the Pulitzer Prize. Foote won Academy Awards for his screenplays for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), which was adapted from the novel by Harper Lee, and Tender Mercies (1983). His other notable scripts include Of Mice and Men (1992), an adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novel of the same name, and Old Man (1997), a made-for-television movie based on The Wild Palms by William Faulkner.

Character Summary:

STELLA

Female
60-80 Stella is the octogenarian matriarch of the clan, ruling over the family with an iron fist. Bold, brash, and not afraid to speak her mind.

MARY JO

Female
25-40 Stella’s younger daughter. She has come to visit from Houston with her husband, Bob. She has very strong feelings about dividing the estate.

LUCILLE

Female
40-50 Stella’s older daughter who lives with Stella on the farm. Very reserved and caters to Stella’s every word.

LEWIS

Male
40-50 Stella’s only son. An alcoholic. He is in favor of dividing the estate because he wastes all of his monthly income. Very loud and opinionated.

SON

Male
20-30 Lucille’s son. He left college to run the family farm/estate when his father died. Very loyal and responsible. A typical farm boy.

BOB

Male
25-40 Mary Jo’s husband. A loud, bombastic oilman who has lost a fortune with the drop in oil. He is out of money and has nowhere to turn.

DOUG

Male
60-80 African-American family retainer who has lived on the farm since Stella was five years old. He does not get along with the guests.

MILDRED

Female
20-30 African-American housekeeper who is slowly taking over control of the household. Doug feels threatened by her.

CATHLEEN

Female
40-50 African American long-suffering servant of the family. Cathleen often wonders about the estate. She and Mildred are working together.

IRENE

Female
20-30 Lewis’ secret girlfriend. She makes an appearance toward the end of the play. She is known as a “floosy”.

PAULINE

Female
20-30 She is the know-it-all schoolteacher engaged to Son. She is an outsider to the family who gains a lot of admiration for her education and good looks.

SISSY

Female
13-19 One of Mary Joe and Bob’s teenage daughters. They are spoiled rotten and show it through every word that comes out of their mouths.

EMILY

Female
13-19 One of Mary Joe and Bob’s teenage daughters. They are spoiled rotten and show it through every word that comes out of their mouths.

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